Functional Materials and Nanostructures

Head of the group:

Nicolas CHAUVIN
Romain BACHELET (Adj.)

Team “Functional Materials and Nanostructures”

The new “Materials” team was born from the fusion of the “Heteroepitaxy and Nanostructures – H&N” and “Spectroscopy and Nanomaterials – S&N” teams. The strength of the team is based on its specific and recognized expertise in the field of monolithic and heterogeneous integration of functional materials on silicon and in advanced structural, optical and electronic characterization methods to probe the properties of complex heterostructures or single nanostructures.

The team’s objective is to conduct multidisciplinary research activities covering the development of materials and their growth mechanisms, the understanding and optimization of their functional properties, as well as the validation of these researches by the fabrication of basic bricks and proofs of concepts.

Two families of materials are investigated, III-V semiconductors and functional oxides, with two key areas of application: i) ICT focusing on photonic, optoelectronic and microelectronic devices, and ii) Energy/Environment by studying energy harvesting, photoelectrolysis and photovoltaics.

 

The team focuses more specifically on three research activities:

 

The team also manages the epitaxial growth facilities of the Nanolyon technology platform, in which it promotes its expertise in epitaxy of heterostructures by MBE (oxides and III-V in particular).

 

Publications of the team on HAL

Highlights

Crystallization of SrTiO3 on Si: the knitting machine

Energy Efficient Embedded Non-Volatile Memory & Logic Based on Ferroelectric Hf(Zr)O2

Growth of GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires for tandem solar cells on silicon

Huge gain in pyroelectric energy conversion through epitaxy for integrated self-powered nanodevices

La “maîtrise du ballon de football” … à l’échelle microscopique

Perovskite-oxide based hyperbolic metamaterials

Telecom-band single photon source monolithically grown on silicon

Deterministic placement of quantum defects in arrays of 4H-SiC micropillars